u

lifeismagic

x

i once saw a scientist
on television.
and she was speaking generally
about science things
(being a scientist and knowing science things
etc.)
and, speaking generally
i am not a science
person,
and while i respect them,
i do not have much interest
in scientists
or science things.
so i went to switch the channel
at the precise moment that the presenter sitting beside the scientist asked:
what,
in your opinion,
is the most ASTOUNDING fact
about the universe
?
and this stopped me.
because it is not often that television presenters ask such interesting questions,
and the scientist was pursing her lips in a thoughtful way that made me think
i wanted to her her answer
to the interesting question.
after a pause,
she did not look directly at the
camera,
but directly at the presenter.

did you know,
she said,
that there are atoms in your body.
the presenter laughed.
of course,
he said.
what else would my body be made of?

well,
said the scientist,
and i did not need to look at the television screen to know
she was smiling.
do you know where those atoms came from?
well,
said the presenter.
and he did not say anything else.
i snickered from my place in the armchair
and the scientist smiled again.

the most ASTOUNDING fact that i have ever known,
she said,
is not a fact, specifically,
but the story of every atom on this planet.
the ones that make up the grass and the sea and the sand and the forests and the human
body.
these atoms came
from stars.

the presenter sat forward and so did i.

stars,
continued the scientist,
are mortal
like humans.
they die,
and, in their later years,
are unstable.
it pains me a little to say it, but a star’s death
is far more dramatic than a human’s.
is it? asked the presenter.
the scientist was looking at him still,
and i felt strongly as though i was listening in on a very private
conversation.

it is, the scientist nodded. the stars
i am referring to,
she said,
collapsed and exploded a very long time ago, and scattered their enriched guts across
the entire universe.
here, she paused, and her words caught in my mind in a way that made me wonder
if she was a scientist
or a poet.
their guts, she said whilst sipping from a glass of water, were splayed across every
inch
of time and space.
these guts were made of the
fundamental ingredients
of life and existence.
carbon and oxygen and nitrogen and hydrogen and all the
rest of it.
all in the bellies of these stars that flung themselves across the universe in protest when it was their time to die.

and then? asked the presenter.
the scientist’s lips quirked upwards. and then, she said.
it all became parts of gas clouds.
ones that condense and collapse and will form our next solar systems -
billions of stars with billions of planets to orbit them.
and these planets have the ingredients of life sewed into the very fabric
of their own lives.

so, she said, smile still playing on her lips -
where do your atoms come from?
from those gas clouds, said the presenter.
no, said the scientist.
from those stars.

every atom, every molecule, every inhale and exhale and beat of your heart, is traceable
to the crucibles that cooked life itself.
and you are sitting here and so am i and so are your viewers at home,
and we’re all in the universe, aren’t we?
yes, said the presenter.
but i’ll tell you what’s even better, the scientist smiled wider.
the universe is in us. your atoms and my atoms and your camera men’s atoms came from those stars. you’re connected and relevant without even having to try. you are made of stardust and the fabric of the universe.
that is the most ASTOUNDING fact
i can tell you.
the presenter smiled and the scientist smiled wider and i smiled too,

and later i switched the channel to something less scientific
and wondered if i should feel small,
tiny and insignificant in relation to the stars that collapsed and exploded and
threw themselves everywhere.
and that is how my mother found me,
sitting on the sofa.
and she asked me what was
wrong,
and i said,
nothing. i’m just a lot smaller than stars are.
my mother is very literal woman. as such, her natural response was:
of course you’re not. don’t you see how small stars are?
that’s only from a distance,
i said.
maybe you’re looking at yourself from a distance too, she said.

and she left the room and it is years later now, but i still
think about the scientist and what she said
and my mother and what she said
and i still see the presenter on television.
and i still think that the stars are very big
but now i think,
they are in me.
so i am big too.

- 'the most astounding fact' - j.c., inspired by neil degrass tyson’s talk of the same name (via girlonfired)

17% of cardiac surgeons are women, 17% of tenured professors are women. It just goes on and on. And isn’t that strange that that’s also the percentage of women in crowd scenes in movies? What if we’re actually training people to see that ratio as normal so that when you’re an adult, you don’t notice?

…We just heard a fascinating and disturbing study where they looked at the ratio of men and women in groups. And they found that if there’s 17% women, the men in the group think it’s 50-50. And if there’s 33% women, the men perceive that as there being more women in the room than men.

-

Source: NPR: Hollywood Needs More Women

Seriously, go listen to this.

(via josette-arnauld)

dopeworldemmanuel:

This what some of you guys missed when watching the Anaconda video by Nicki Minaj

crowmunculus:

Okay, this is an emergency and I need help. By Tuesday September 16th, I need to find a new place to board my puppy or I will not be able to keep him. His life is potentially on the line.

I potentially have a place for him to stay short term but it’s $25 a night and I can’t afford that for the full length of time I need until my internship ends and I will be able to house him again (until November 10th)

I have - maybe, if I’m lucky - about $700 to pay for boarding expenses. I will have more money in January when my winter financial aid kicks in, so I can pay much more if someone is willing to work with me on deferred payments. About the best I can do long-term right now is $10 or $15 a day, with all expenses like food paid for.

I need to find someone who knows how to handle fear-aggressive dogs, is located in Washington, Oregon, or Idaho, and will NOT use unnecessary force like shock collars, alpha-rolling, prong collars, or yelling.

Please, please, please help me and my baby. If you know anyone or anything at all that could help me out, please send me an ask to let me know. Monetary donations to help pay for boarding are appreciated more than I can put into words - my paypal is here and there’s also a donations button on my sidebar if this link doesn’t work.

Here’s a picture:

image

Please help us!

was-that-a-pun:

superpunch2:

Mars is the only planet in the solar system solely inhabited by functioning robots.

oh

owning-my-truth:

tashabilities:

thefemaletyrant:

cheersapplespears:

thefemaletyrant:

everything-naija:

blood—sport:

Important things from Igbohistory Instagram. European colonialism has, and still continues to dismantle the myriad of sophisticated social constructs upheld by so many African ethnicities, by presenting Africa as a unit by choosing to ignore the huge ocean of differences between ethnic groups, let alone countries.

Did Igbohistory quote the person who actually wrote this? As I read this, I had the feeling that I’d read the exact words before and not from Igbohistory. In fact I believe that I shared a link to the original essay on my tumblr years ago but I can’t find it now, I will sha…

I was taught this in my African History class, and since then i stopped referring to my people (Yoruba) and other ethic groups of Africa and the world as tribes. This large groups of people are nations with strong rich history and deserve to be respected as such. 

i do hope that igbohistory doesn’t claim that this is their own work, and they simply forgot to cite where the information comes from. 

I updated! I made a mistake pls, it was very similar to another essay I’d read but not the same.

I BEEN saying this, YES.

'Tribe' is a white anthropological word meant to diminish.

And can people still stop referring to the Amazigh as “Berbers” which means “barbarian”. Otherwise great points.

music player codey
viwan themes